364: How Writing Is Like Walking a Tightrope — Interview with Ana Maria Spagna

Creative364: How Writing Is Like Walking a Tightrope — Interview with Ana Maria Spagna

364: How Writing Is Like Walking a Tightrope — Interview with Ana Maria Spagna

Today, I have the pleasure of interviewing Ana Maria Spagna.

Ana Maria is the author of Uplake: Restless Essays of Coming and Going and several previous nonfiction books on nature, work, civil, indigenous, and LGBTQ rights. Her previous books include: Reclaimers, stories of elder women reclaiming sacred land and water, which was a finalist for the 2016 Rachel Carson Book Award from the Society of Environmental Journalists, the memoir/history Test Ride on the Sunnyland Bus: A Daughter’s Civil Rights Journey, winner of the 2010 River Teeth literary nonfiction prize, 100 Skills You’ll Need for the End of the World (as We Know It) which is a humor-infused exploration of how to live more lightly on the planet, and two essay collections, Potluck and Now Go Home.  Her first novel for young people, The Luckiest Scar on Earth, about a 14 year-old snowboarder and her activist father, released in 2017, and her first chapbook of poetry, Mile Marker Six, will appear from Finishing Line Press this fall. 

Ana Maria’s work has been recognized by the Nautilus Book Awards, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Awards, and as a four-time finalist for the Washington State Book Award. Her essays have appeared in Orion, Ecotone, Fourth Genre, Creative Nonfiction, Brevity, The Normal School, and regularly in High Country News. After working fifteen years on backcountry trail crews for the National Park Service, she turned to teaching and is currently on the faculty of the low-residency MFA programs at Antioch University, Los Angeles and Western Colorado University.

 

In this episode Ana Maria and I discuss:

  • How to write, assemble, and edit collections for two genres at the same time.
  • The importance of non-writing work and why it is so valuable to the process.
  • What writers of prose can learn from reading and writing poetry.

 

Plus, her #1 tip for writers.

For more info and show notes: www.diymfa.com/364

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